Tag Archive | IPv6

Tumbleweed install, March 2015

As previously mentioned, I am doing an install every month.  This is mostly to test installing with the Tumbleweed DVD image.  You can think of it as early testing for opensuse 13.3.  So yesterday (March 12) was my install day for this month.

Downloading

I normally expect downloading to be unremarkable.  I usually don’t have problems.  I didn’t have problems with this download either, but it was surprisingly slow.

Browsing to the downloads site, I copied the download link.  I then used:

wget download-link.sha256
aria2c -V -R download-link

I have substituted “download-link” for the actual link, since that change every time so the actual link isn’t very useful for posting here.

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IPv6 privacy extensions

As I have mentioned in recent posts, I am pretty new to having an IPv6 address so I am only now learning about some of its features and problems.  What I describe here is probably familiar to those who are already IPv6 connected.

One of those features — some people consider it a misfeature — is the privacy extensions.

Multiple addresses

After receiving IPv6 support from my ISP, and after restarting the network so as to access this support, I used the linux command:

# ifconfig -a

to list my IP addresses.  And that command showed that I had two IPv6 addresses.  One of those began with “fe80:” and was listed as “Scope:Link”.  It is intended for communication on the LAN.  I actually had that IPv6 address long before my ISP made IPv6 available.  Communication on the LAN does not depend on the ISP.

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IPv6 addressing and dual-boot with Windows

Since getting IPv6 access, I’ve spent a little time looking into IPv6 addresses.  So I thought I would share some of that on this blog.

An IPv6 address is 128 bits in length.  So there won’t be a shortage anytime soon.

An address can be thought of as having three parts.  There’s a prefix, typically assigned by the ISP.  Then there’s a portion that can be used on a campus WAN, to distinguish different local subnets.  And then there’s the local part which identifies individual computers on the LAN.  The local part is often the last 64 bits of the IPv6 address.

In my case, my ISP has assigned a 60 bit prefix.  My router has assigned the next 4 bits, which presumably would allow up to 16 subnets.  And the last 64 bits are for the LAN portion, and are to be assigned to individual computers on the LAN. Read More…