Opensuse 12.2 is still looking very good

I posted a preliminary report yesterday, after my first install of 12.2.  Since then, I have installed on three more systems, for a total of 4.  These have been among the smoothest installs that I have ever done.

On my main desktop system, I installed last evening, and finalized the customizing today.  I have now installed latex, though I have only tested that lightly.  For desktops, I have installed KDE, LXDE, XFCE and Gnome on all four installations.  One of the installs was on older 32 bit hardware, with the others on more recent 64 bit systems.  All installs were done using the DVD image, written to a USB flash drive.

My most recent install was on my laptop.  I did say that I would leave 12.1 there for a while.  And, indeed, I am leaving 12.1 there.  I installed 12.2 in my test partition, where I had been testing beta releases.  With that test setup, I am using encrypted “/home” and encrypted swap, as two separate LUKS encrypted partitions.  I ran into problems with that on 12.2 RC2 (the earlier release candidate).  I was not properly prompted for the encryption key during the first boot, and had to come up with a few tricks to get it running.  But, with the final 12.2 release, it installed without a problem.  My other installs have been with an encrypted LVM, and those also went smoothly.

Here are the very minor difficulties that I encountered:

  • On my desktop, after setting up NFS, I was unable to see the NFS shares from another system.  Checking the firewall, the NFS setup had added appropriate firewall rules for the external zone, but the ethernet card was not in the external zone (or any zone).  Once I fixed that, NFS worked as it should.
  • On my work machine (my first install), I ran into a minor problem on the first reboot.  The hardware is apparently set to always boot from a USB, if a bootable USB is plugged in.  So, when it came to the first reboot, I immediately booted into my install USB instead of to the installed system.  Now there is an option “boot from hard disk” on the install media menu.  So, naturally, I used that.  And it took me back to booting the same USB.  The trouble with a USB (instead of a DVD), is that the USB looks to the system as if it is a hard disk.  Well, no real problem.  I hit CTRL-ALT-DEL while on the boot menu, and unplugged the USB.  Once it began booting from the real hard disk (the newly installed system), I plugged the USB back in since it is needed for the final stages of configuration.

I have not run into any other problem.  Looking at opensuse forums, there were a few people with problems.  But they were very few.  There problems may be specific to their hardware.

That may leave 12.2 as the best release ever.

 

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About Neil Rickert

Retired mathematician and computer scientist who dabbles in cognitive science.

6 responses to “Opensuse 12.2 is still looking very good”

  1. Mich says :

    Primarily using Debian and install openSUSE 12.2 KDE for a test drive – so far so good.

    Did notice that the time required for Firefox to start-up (from clicking on icon to Firefox showing up) was unusually long as compared.

    Firefox icon bounced for approximately 15 seconds before showing while in Debian, Firefox will pops up in less than 5 seconds.

    Think you can help to confirm if it’s a norm or I’m the outlier.

    Like

    • Neil Rickert says :

      I just timed startup of firefox. For me, it took about 2 seconds.

      The difficulty here is that it will depend on processor speed, memory speed, disk speed. It might also depend on whether firefox has been previously used – there could be a copy of the code sitting around in memory and that speeds up the loading. And then it will also depend on what extensions you are using.

      Fifteen seconds sounds quite long. I don’t think it is that long for me, even in a slow old (2004 vintage) computer.

      Here’s a thought. Firefox checks a list of phish sites, to help identify malicious pages. For your privacy, it downloads a file with the list instead of sending your url off to google to check. Maybe starting up firefox just happened to trigger that download, and perhaps the network was slow responding.

      I turned of that security feature, which might be why firefox loads a lot faster for me. (I turned it off, because I spend time investigating phish sites, and I would not be able to do that if firefox were blocking them).

      Like

  2. Mich says :

    I do agree with you that 12-15 seconds is quite long compared to 2 -3 seconds.

    For what’s it’s worth, I’ve tried it on a Thinkpad i5 (with nvidia + 4 Gb of ram) and a Thinkpad i7 (Intel video + 4Gb of ram). So the slowness shouldn’t be due to hardware.

    Deleted the existing firefox profile and starts fresh – still gets the same slow startup times. Dual boot with Debian on the same laptop and firefox is fast there.

    I assume you download the DVD for the installation. Did you are taking the timing when in KDE or other desktops?

    Like

  3. Mich says :

    You mentioned :

    “Here’s a thought. Firefox checks a list of phish sites, to help identify malicious pages. For your privacy, it downloads a file with the list instead of sending your url off to google to check. Maybe starting up firefox just happened to trigger that download, and perhaps the network was slow responding.:

    As I’m using a 50 – 100M line, so network speed should be okay.
    and firefox homepage is a local page.

    Anyway, you may be correct – tried starting Firefox without any network connections and it started without 2 seconds. Connec to the wireless network and 12 seconds again.

    Just curious – how do you disble the “checks a list of phish sites” thingy?

    Like

    • Neil Rickert says :

      Just curious – how do you disble the “checks a list of phish sites” thingy?

      Preferences –> Security, then:
      uncheck “Block reported attack sites”
      uncheck “Block reported web forgeries”

      Like

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